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Roundabout 2017

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Roundabout in Stoke-on-Trent 2015.

We’re excited to announce our rep of three brand new plays for Roundabout 2017. Roundabout will pop-up outside Theatr Clwyd in June and July before embarking on a UK tour to Salford, Poole, Margate, Kendal, Stoke-on-Trent, Darlington, Lincoln and Luton.

James and George had this to say:

“Roundabout will again tour the UK with three world premieres in partnership with Theatr Clwyd and theOrange Tree. Elinor Cook’s OUT OF LOVE is a very funny, topical, heart-tugging exploration of female friendship spanning 30 years. We’re honoured to be premiering another of Elinor’s plays following TEN WEEKS in Programme 2016. Elinor was on attachment to Paines Plough through The Big Room in 2011 and has since won the George Devine Award and become one of the most vital, distinctive new voices in theatre. Roundabout will also host the World Premiere of Brad Birch’s new play BLACK MOUNTAIN, a nerve-jangling psychological thriller showcasing the style and comic brio that marks Brad out in the vanguard of Welsh playwrights. HOW TO BE A KID is a vivid new play for young people by Manchester’s Sarah McDonald Hughes which tackles some big subjects with extraordinary lightness of touch and a lot of joyous dancing to Taylor Swift.”

Read all about the new plays below.

A Paines Plough, Theatr Clwyd and Orange Tree Theatre production
BLACK MOUNTAIN
By Brad Birch

Black Mountain Web Treated

Rebecca and Paul are running away. Away from memories and mistakes.

They’re trying to save their relationship. They need time and space. An isolated house in the country is the perfect place to work things out. They set themselves rules: they have to be honest, they have to listen and they have to be fair.

But you can’t run forever. Especially when you’re being followed.

BLACK MOUNTAIN is a tense psychological thriller about betrayal and forgiveness by winner of the Harold Pinter Commission Brad Birch.

BLACK MOUNTAIN will tour in Roundabout in September and October.

 

A Paines Plough, Theatr Clwyd and Orange Tree Theatre production
OUT OF LOVE

By Elinor Cook

Better Than She Should Be Web Treated

Lorna and Grace do everything together. They share crisps, cigarettes and crushes. That’s what happens when you’re best friends forever.

But when Lorna gets a place at University, and Grace gets pregnant, they suddenly find themselves in starkly different worlds. Can anything bridge the gap between them?

A tale of friendship, love and rivalry over thirty years from award-winning playwright Elinor Cook.

‘Intelligent and savagely funny’ The Times on Elinor Cook

OUT OF LOVE will tour in Roundabout in September and October.

 

A Paines Plough, Theatr Clwyd and Orange Tree Theatre production
HOW TO BE A KID
By Sarah McDonald-Hughes

How To Be A Kid Web Treated

Molly cooks. Molly does the dishes. Molly gets her little brother Joe ready for school. Molly is only 12, but she doesn’t feel much like a kid anymore.

Now Molly’s Mum is feeling better, maybe things will get back to normal. Can you help Molly learn how to be a kid again?

Join Molly, Joe and her Nan for a larger than life story of family, friends and fitting in.

Warning: Contains dancing, chocolate cake and an epic car chase.

For ages 7+.

HOW TO BE A KID will tour in Roundabout in September and October.

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That’s Roundabout 2017. Let us know what you think on Twitter or Facebook or even Instagram. We’re up for anything.

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A postcard from Eccles

Roundabout Assistant Director Anna sent us this postcard from Eccles. We had such a lovely four days working with The Lowry to pop up as part of Love Eccles Festival.

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This week we’re in Margate. Next week we’re in Lincoln. And after that we just keep touring. See full tour dates here.

Roundabout @ Love Eccles, Salford

RBT Eccles

Roundabout outside Eccles Parish Church

The time has come. Roundabout is on tour. Our first post-Edinburgh date is as part of the Love Eccles Festival in Salford. We’ve partnered with the brilliant team at The Lowry to station Roundabout in Eccles Parish church 08-11 September. Between us and the wonderful Love Eccles Festival we’ve programmed a four day extravaganza with something for everyone.

Here’s everything that’s going on:

Thursday

17:00 ROUNDABOUT TOUR
18:00 WORKSHOP: MAKING WORK IN THE ROUND
19:30 LOVE, LIES AND TAXIDERMY
21:00 MANFORD’S COMEDY CLUB

Friday

10:00 FIRST STEPS
11:00 I GOT SUPERPOWERS FOR MY BIRTHDAY
12:00 WORKSHOP: Schools
13:00 MESSY CHURCH
14:30 GROWTH (Baby Friendly)
15:30 ROUNDABOUT: MEET THE CAST
17:00 ROUNDABOUT TOUR
19:00 SALFORD’S TASTE OF HONEY
20:00 GROWTH
21:30 ROB AUTON: THE SLEEP SHOW

Saturday 

10:00 ROOTS, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
11:30 SOUNDWAVES AND WATERWAYS
13:00 ECCLES TALENT SHOWCASE
14:15 ROUNDBOUT TOUR
15:00 I GOT SUPERPOWERS FOR MY BIRTHDAY (Relaxed)
16:00 ROUNDABOUT: MEET THE CAST
18:00 BARTON THEATRE COMPANY: UP YOUR STREET
19:30 LOVE, LIES AND TAXIDERMY

Sunday

10:30 YEMENI COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION EVENT
12:30 DANCEWORKS SHOWCASE
14:30 I GOT SUPERPOWERS FOR MY BIRTHDAY
16:30 LOVE, LIES AND TAXIDERMY (Baby Friendly)

 

You can book for any of these events on The Lowry’s website here. Or call the Box Office on 0843 208 6010.

Tickets are all £5 or less.

Did you know?

The brilliant Barton Theatre Company operate out of nearby Smiths Restaurant where the ticket price includes a meal. Sit down for your meal then head down the basement for a studio theatre performance. That’s our kind of venue.

Smiths by Anthony McCarthy

Smiths by Anthony McCarthy

Roundabout Round-Up

We can hardly believe it, but Roundabout opened it’s doors for the final time this year earlier in the month. What a whirlwind it’s been as our portable, plug-in-and-play auditorium has undertaken a whistle stop tour, taking it all across our green and pleasant land.

Audiences of all ages have been delighted by our wide-ranging repertoire and now we’re looking back at all the moments that made us laugh and smile.

Newbury

Salford

“A masterclass in storytelling that had every audience member lapping up every word…”★★★★★ The Reviews Hub

The Human Ear is a fine piece of drama” ★★★★ The Reviews Hub

“…gives us real food for thought.”★★★★ The Reviews Hub

Lincoln

Lungs is “clever, excellent, and powerful”” (The Linc)

Kendal

“Portable dome will be home to cutting-edge theatre” (Cumbria Live)

“Students’ actors get an inside ‘view'” (West Morland Gazette)

“ARTS: cutting edge theatre in a Roundabout way” (West Morland Gazette)

Margate

Stoke

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“​Pop-up theatre ‘the Roundabout’ set to wow crowds in Hanley” (Stoke Sentinel)

And you can listen to Hanna on BBC Radio Stoke here, at around the 2hour 15 minute mark.

We’ve been thrilled and humbled by the responses from everyone who has visited and taken in a show and we want to say a massive THANK YOU for coming came along. We’ve loved every minute! Now we’re off to plan next year’s Roundabout programme and we’re determined to knocks your socks off – see you then!

Team PP x

We’re off to… Salford

EVERY BRILLIANT THING has been zigging and zagging it’s way across the UK for over a month now – phew! We set ourselves a mission to make the most of each location so asked our friends at The Lowry for the lowdown on what’s good round Salford way! Here’s their suggestions of what ‘brilliant things’ we could get up to…

NIGHTSHOT 3 (2)

Where to stay

The Holiday Inn Express on Salford Quays is great for spotting celebs on their way in and out of the BBC studios…

Where to eat

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The Lowry Restaurant (of course!) Part of the theatre itself it’s ideally located if you’re coming to a show, having a wander round MediaCity or simply want to admire the Quays.

Where to drink

The Kings Arms in Salford is a brilliant little pub theatre – good beer, great shows and the best Sunday lunch in the city!

Where to get coffee

The Lowry’s Tower Coffee shop does great ‘Grumpy Mule’ coffee (it keeps the staff going!), though if you fancy heading a little further afield Pokusevskis café and deli at Mediacity UK is a definite winner!

Hang out

In front of the big screen on the Piazza at MediaCity. In the summer you can lounge round on deck chairs and watch Wimbledon with a cool drink in hand – bliss!

Must see

Take the lift up to the top of the air shaft at the Imperial War Museum North for stunning views across the city and out to the Peak District on a clear day.

The 1st day of The 8th

Sunday Sabbath? Not in the world of rock ‘n roll. With just one day in London to wash clothes and fold away any newly-bought Tartan from Glasgow, Paines Plough were on the 8.10am to Manchester to kick off rehearsals for The 8th.

The two shows could not stand in starker contrast. Good with People takes place in a lochside, marine base town in Scotland. The 8th, in the religious underbelly of the Deep South. The former is punctuated by unspoken thoughts and underlying tension, the latter by spiralling guitar solos and the raspy orations of a Christian preacher.

Slightly croaky-throated ourselves, we made our way across the city to the King’s Arms, Salford. Setting up in the upstairs room of the pub were Christian on keys, Jonny Wright on bass, Jonny Lexus on guitar, Pete on drums and Jamie also on keys. Our actor Reg, the voice of the preacher, was sipping water, preparing to rehearse all the spoken narrative sections of a musical piece.

This is no small task given that he is expected to tell these stories himself, colouring the details and bringing to life the important events in the journey purely by the way he narrates the tale. Added to that is the general distraction of strings, synth, drums and keys; it takes a certain type of actor to hold his ground centre stage in such a piece.

And yet, the tempo with which these rehearsals have to move does not allow for too much deliberation. Although lodged somewhere in the memory of most people in the room as they performed last time as well, there are only four days to put together a show that has eight singers doing eight different numbers. They have to work in harmony with the narrative that interweaves all their ‘sins’ together, so that Ché Walker and Paul Heaton’s lyrics and story can be appreciated in their entirety.

Maybe the way the room was set out best describes how the rehearsal room worked on day one. Everyone in the room created a circle, with the centre of the room the place to send the sound. Eye contact was crucial not only for timing, but also for everyone to be able to speak on behalf of their instrument or specific skill. Discussions were more often than not communal, and given that there were so many disciplines and ideologies present, sometimes translation work needed to be done.

If the creative team gave a note, and it needed to become manifest musically, it was for the musicians to decide how that might be achieved. They would improvise or suggest to one another as those less musically inclined listened. Whilst this was done, Reg might get some notes on where to best place the beats in his interventions, or which details in the story to really paint for the audience, so that the story is clear. Then everyone would come back and rehearse the same section, putting all the elements together.

Sometimes the note would have transferred itself to the music first time, others not. The musicians might not agree with a certain piece of direction, then listen to the explanation and agree, or vice versa. This process of trial and error continued until all the narrative sections had successfully been underscored, and everyone in the circle was happy with the final outcome.

Interspersed with this process were numerous fag breaks, pint refills and points of information from tour management about the schedule for the next week. The general feel of the room was extremely relaxed, but there was also a desire to finish what needed to be done. Which, by the end of the day, it was.

Day two is to be spent repeating what was produced on day one. Then the singers are to join, whilst the lyrics are refined with Che in the room.